Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for "the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have masses"

[Published October 2015]

The ANTARES Collaboration congratulates Takaati Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald who were awarded on October 6th the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 for "the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have masses". Read the Press Release of the Royal Swedish Academy of Science.
Some of the results obtained by A. B. McDonald and the SNO Collaboration, related to solar neutrinos, are summarised in Figure 1 below (see also the SNO Page and Ahmad et al., 2002). The results obtained by T. Kajita and the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, related to atmospheric neutrinos, are shown in Figure 2 (see also the SK Page and Fukuda et al., 1999).

In 2012, the ANTARES Collaboration reported the observation of oscillations from atmospheric muon neutrinos, yielding an independent measurement of the oscillation parameters. This was obtained using muon tracks with energies as low as 20 GeV, while the telescope was primarily optimised for TeV neutrino energies. The results were presented in Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope.

Fig. 1 : Measurement by the SNO experiment of muon and tau neutrino flux from the Sun as a function of the electron neutrino flux, showing that the total flux is consistent with solar models. Taken from PDG2014.


Fig. 2 : Measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment of muon or electron neutrino flux as a function of the arrival direction of the neutrinos (a cosine = -1 meaning upward going), showing that muon neutrinos "disappear" (change flavor) during their travel through Earth.  The red-dotted line shows the expectations in case of no-oscillation. Taken from PDG2014.